4 Ways to communicate your brand in your Whiteboard Explainer Film

4 Ways to communicate your brand in your Whiteboard Explainer Film

Your brand identity is important and representing it properly in your whiteboard animations and explainer films is essential. This blog has four tips on how you can include and reinforce your brand in your films.

Supercharge Your Social Media With Cognitive

Supercharge Your Social Media With Cognitive

Whiteboard Animations and illustrations can take your social media engagement to the next level. Read our post to find out why, and how our illustrations helped Project Everyone super-charge their story!

The Five Ways To Make Your Whiteboard Animation Stand Out

The Five Ways To Make Your Whiteboard Animation Stand Out

What is the difference between just another Whiteboard Animation and one that goes above and beyond, and really speaks to you? At Cognitive we think there are five things that make the difference, and we put them into each of our Whiteboard Animations to make them the best they can be.

Why Whiteboard Animation Works So Well

Why Whiteboard Animation Works So Well

Senior Creative Kayle McLeish talks about what makes Whiteboard Animation such an effective tool for creatives that make explainer films, comparing it to a Swiss Army Knife.

Why Whiteboard animations make great explainer videos

Why Whiteboard animations make great explainer videos

At Cognitive, we are passionate about visual storytelling and helping our clients tell more engaging stories. We pioneered whiteboard animation and still lead the way in setting the highest standards in visual storytelling. Read the blog to find why we think whiteboard animation is so effective.

Professor Ray Laurence: Animation, History and University Research

Professor Ray Laurence: Animation, History and University Research

Professor Ray Laurence talks about the ways translating his research into explainer videos with Cognitive has dramatically increased the reach of his work and triggered debate among people across the world.

The Power of Visual Language

The Power of Visual Language

Often the very first books we encounter are picture books, our first introduction to the power of rich visual language. While our books change, the power of this language doesn’t. Senior Creative Dan Stirrup reflects on this visual language from picture books to explainer films and Whiteboard Animation.

Explainer Videos: When to use and what to choose

Explainer Videos: When to use and what to choose

Explainer videos are an amazing tool. They allow you to communicate your story powerfully and memorably. This blog post explores when you should use them and which type of explainer video is right for you.

10 ways to improve the social impact of your Explainer Film

10 ways to improve the social impact of your Explainer Film

You’ve put a lot of work into your explainer video, how do you get the most from it? Here are ten steps to launch your explainer film and get it out to your audience!

Visualising and explaining Prof. Stephen Hawking's Supertranslations theory

Visualising and explaining Prof. Stephen Hawking's Supertranslations theory

Black Holes might not seem to be visually engaging at the outset. Ultimately there’s not a lot to work with when you think of a hole that swallows light so nothing can be seen. But for Cognitive this is exactly the sort of challenge we love. Hear from Andrew Park about how he and the team visually translated Prof Hawking’s final Black Hole theory of Supertranslations.

Talk to the Hand - Andrew Park on RSAnimates

Talk to the Hand - Andrew Park on RSAnimates

Originally published by the RSA in 2015, Andrew Park muses on his creation of the RSAnimates style and the invention of whiteboard animation. ‘When one returns to something there is a tendency to look back over what went before - to assess where you have come from in order to move forward. ‘

Visualising Attachment - Our latest film for Cynthia Hall AND the Karyn Purvis Institute

Visualising Attachment - Our latest film for Cynthia Hall AND the Karyn Purvis Institute

Read about the new whiteboard animation film we made for Cynthia Hall Productions for the Karyn Purvis Institute of Child Development and how we applied our visual thinking to explain attachment theory and the technique of TBRI (Trust Based Relational Intervention)

Illustrating Nature's Stories - Behind the scenes of our latest film for The North American Forest Partnership

Illustrating Nature's Stories - Behind the scenes of our latest film for The North American Forest Partnership

Continuing our series of animated explainer videos for the North American Forest Partnership, we explore ‘Wildfire’; the effects it has on the forest and what can be done by local communities to manage it.

Creating appealing characters – Simplify and exaggerate!

Cognitive illustrator Aggie shows how reference images can only get us part of the way in designing appealing and emotive characters

Cognitive illustrator Aggie shows how reference images can only get us part of the way in designing appealing and emotive characters

A little bit of caricature is needed to stylise and give more appeal to the visual result.
— Aggie Mardiyah

Conveying complex ideas and feelings through pictures can be more effective than relying on mere words. That’s why people come to us - we bring stories to life in a way that’s more fun and engaging!

Cognitive illustrator Aggie Mardiyah

Cognitive illustrator Aggie Mardiyah

A lot of the time, we use characters to help aid with our storytelling which is why, as an Illustrator, I often study figures in real life and from video/photo references to improve my anatomy and sense of motion. However, through repeated practice and experience, I’ve learned that what we see in real life doesn’t always translate well into clear shots and when drawn, can feel quite lifeless. This is where a little bit of caricature is needed to stylise and give more appeal to the visual result. This is also why animated characters are often simplified and exaggerated - because they help tell a better story.

Exploring movements and poses that don’t necessarily obey the rules of real-life physics, is probably one of the best, fun and challenging things about being an illustrator. A good way to do this is by gesture drawing, which is a method of capturing the feeling of a figure’s movement. You can do this by drawing the pose as you see it in reference, then figuring out which parts of the body you can bend and push to make the pose work better. Or, like me, you can start by cutting out all the fluff and use just a few pencil strokes to capture the line of action, and then build on it. However you choose to do it, a gesture drawing should be able to fully express the action and convey the intended emotion in the clearest way possible – it’s not always just about how accurate your drawing looks (although it is important to keep things in proportions), but rather how it feels!

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“A gesture drawing should be able to fully express the action and convey the intended emotion in the clearest way possible.”
— Aggie Mardiyah

As well as body language, knowing how to communicate what a character is feeling through their facial expression is equally as important. The same rules of exaggeration can be applied here to intensify emotions. It should, however, be done with more care as modifying a human-like face too much can lead to an unsettling outcome - unless that was the intention!

There would be times when I need to draw a character pulling some type of expression, but not really knowing how to draw it. This is where using multiple photo references or even a mirror can help massively! You shouldn’t be looking to copy exactly what you see, instead you should study the angles, how the face squash and stretch, which bits to accentuate, and then adjust and apply it to your character.

Remember, drawing from imagination should be about using knowledge and experience
— Aggie Mardiyah
Cognitive Blog - Creating Appealing Characters - Image 03

Remember, drawing from imagination should be about using knowledge and experience – if you’re still unfamiliar or unsure of something, there is no need to feel bad about using references. It doesn’t make you less of an artist!

There is no need to feel bad about using references. It doesn’t make you less of an artist!
— Aggie Mardiyah
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Stages of Samatha - Visualisation and Metaphor

The elephant is a metaphor for a, potentially, difficult to control mind.

The elephant is a metaphor for a, potentially, difficult to control mind.

Everything is a story. We are hard-wired to tell stories because they help us navigate life's complex social problems. Stories are the cornerstone to what we do at Cognitive and they can be used to change the world for the better. Cognitive illustrator Alex Hedworth explores how ancient Buddhist teachings use stories to help develop meditative concentration through the power of visualisation. A process that has helped millions of tuned-in souls live a more mindful life.

Stories are the cornerstone to what we do at Cognitive and they can be used to change the world for the better.
— Andrew Park
Cognitive illustrator Alex Hedworth

Cognitive illustrator Alex Hedworth

As an illustrator and avid meditator I have always found the Buddhist visualisations of the meditative path to be both informative and aesthetically pleasing.  Similar to the 'Storymaps' that we work with here at Cognitive the Buddhist depiction of the stages of samatha meditation features numerous visual metaphors for one of the most complex subjects known to man….the mind!

The word samatha refers to pacifying or calming the mind and this story map is a visualisation of all the different stages of this process.  At the beginning of the stages the meditator is depicted chasing after a monkey that is leading an elephant on a rope.  The elephant is used as a visual metaphor for the mind because of its potential to cause harm and difficulty to control. Its dark colour represents the hindrances and problems of the mind. 

The dark elephant of the human mind - Illustrated by Alex Hedworth

The dark elephant of the human mind - Illustrated by Alex Hedworth

The monkey represents attention and its dark colour means that the attention is scattered and unruly. The monkey dragging the elephant along on a leash is a funny and clever way to depict how mischievous our attention is, wherever attention goes the mind will follow and attention doesn’t always have the minds best interest at heart.  The meditator holds a goad and a rope in his hands, they symbolise the intention to tame the mind and the vigilant mindfulness needed in order to do it.

The 'Monkey Mind' is hard to tame! Illustration by Alex Hedworth

The 'Monkey Mind' is hard to tame! Illustration by Alex Hedworth

As this Buddhist “Storymap” progresses and the meditator moves further and further along the path the elephant and monkey slowly but surely fall into line.  The dark colours of the animals lighten and become luminous as the various hindrances and worries of the mind are shed.  Eventually the meditator gains full control as the monkey disappears and the elephant graciously accepts his authority.

Cognitive Blog Meditation and Visualisation Path
As this Buddhist “Storymap” progresses and the meditator moves further and further along the path the elephant and monkey slowly but surely fall into line.
— Alex Hedworth

Even after hundreds of years the visual language used in the depictions of the stages of meditation are still very pertinent and easy to understand.  This speaks to the power of images, which have been used as a way to communicate ideas since time immemorial.  It is also really interesting to see how the fundamental tools we use everyday at Cognitive, such as mapping out a story arc or using a metaphor to simplify and explain a complex idea, can be used in the pursuit of mental and spiritual improvement.

When pictures really are worth a thousand words

Illustration of Shaun Tan by Cognitive Illustrator Suzanne Mills

Illustration of Shaun Tan by Cognitive Illustrator Suzanne Mills

Our visuals reflect, embody and embellish, rather than confuse or distract.
— Suzanne Mills
Cognitive Illustrator Suzanne Mills

Cognitive Illustrator Suzanne Mills

At Cognitive we tell stories. If you want to remember a message then storytelling is the best vehicle to do this. Our brains are far more engaged by stories than lists of facts and figures. We use images to help supercharge those messages. Images add a component to storytelling that text cannot: speed! Our eyes can 'read' images far faster than reading text alone. To help explore this concept one of our brilliant illustrators, Suzanne Mills shared her love of the graphic novel 'The Arrival' by Shaun Tan which uses images alone to unpack its story.

Suzanne: At Cognitive, our work revolves around telling stories. An animated film might be pretty, but without a clear message at it’s core, it would be empty and forgettable. When our team responds to a script, we know we’ve hit the right notes when our visuals reflect, embody and embellish, rather than confuse or distract. The narrative behind our work should shine through, not be hidden, and we’re always on the lookout to learn from masters of this skill.

Fewer examples of visualisation out there are as stunningly unique than ‘The Arrival’ by Australian illustrator Shaun Tan, a wordless comic depicting a migrant’s journey. From the start, the visuals communicate as powerfully as words – if not more. A setting is built by illustrations of a child’s drawing, hot coffee, a half-packed trunk.

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan 

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan 

An animated film might be pretty, but without a clear message at it’s core, it would be empty and forgettable.
— Suzanne Mills

Our protagonist is shown leaving his desolate family home and boarding a rickety train, then a steam ferry. When he disembarks, a series of clues hint that our protagonist might be a refugee. He attends a health inspection and interview - recognisable as immigration checks.

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan

The next panels display a city full of dynamic shapes and movement. Juxtaposition between the old and new settings tell us we’re somewhere thriving and new. Tan’s next clue is given when we expect words to appear at last (e.g. shop windows, road signs) and what we see instead is this:

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan

From his actions, it dawns on us is that these symbols are not just unreadable to us, but also our protagonist. He is surprised by the alien creatures that surprise us, is as baffled by the symbols as we are and struggles to communicate with the locals. Without a word, Tan puts us in this man’s shoes – we empathize with his fortunate escape, but simultaneously feel his displacement and alarm.

Another impressive aspect of  ‘The Arrival’ is how we understand the passage of time from his layout. When the protagonist is working hard or is distracted by others (e.g. starting his first job or making friends) the frames are small and condensed on the page, and the time between each panel is sped up. But when he is alone and his emotions are the focus, the panels are larger - sometimes a double-page-spread - and pull out to show the alien city environment. His sense of feeling small in an unfamiliar city is a constant reminder amidst the action of the story. Tan also uses colour, altering the warmth of his grayscale illustrations depending of the mood of the story.

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan

Finally, our protagonist’s family join him. We see his daughter introduce a lost-looking woman to the new land (an echo of the panel at the beginning, where a local welcomed our nervous protagonist - now his family are shown to have gained citizenship.

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan

Published by Hodder & Stoughton Children's Books 2006 © Shaun Tan

Although Cognitive films have the luxury of scripts to help convey the message, we aim to connect with our viewers as robustly as Tan. We’re reminded of the importance of easily readable facial expressions, gestures and 'costuming' when designing characters.We do use voice-over and words in our work, but it is important that we drive the narrative with clear, concise and unambiguous drawing. By telling part of the story with characters and backgrounds alone, you can speak volumes in seconds.

The beauty of Scribe animations is they can deliver more than one information stream at a time, which means the images can be more playful and don’t have to literally translate the information text to image.

In the animated explainer video we made for BAA, the challenge we had was explaining a full day’s arrivals operations at Heathrow, the second busiest airport in the world in just three minutes.We used a number of different visual approaches to bring the story to life. We used a large geographic map of west London to Frame the location. The landscape became a character in the piece and we had fun illustrating London like a 'toy town'. Using motion graphics employing Heathrow's brand colours and our famous video-scribing technique we could direct the audiences attention to information in time with the voice-over. We used expressive characters, informative icons and symbols working in harmony with a precise voice-over.

The beauty of Scribe animations is they can deliver more than one information stream at a time, which means the images can be more playful and don't have to literally translate the information text to image. For example when we wanted to depict wind patterns over London we used a large electric fan. The weather became characters also.  Using metaphor in this way encourages the audience to understand the complex information in a familiar and enjoyable way.